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Video is king when it comes to sales and marketing. Email Monks reports that video email marketing provides a 280% higher return than emails without video. A survey from the Content Marketing Institute found that 73% of B2B marketers use video as part of their marketing strategy.

For many brands, the easiest place to start using video is through how-to videos that appeal to your target audience or explainer videos outlining the value-add of your product. A study by the Aberdeen Group found “that the majority of top organizations use video content for things like marketing awareness (67%), conversions (60%), and lead nurturing (53%).”

From a sales perspective, video can put a human face in front of your product and educate people about what exactly it is you’re selling.

Once you’ve got someone hooked, use video to reel him in. Did you secure a pitch meeting or demo with someone at a company? Nice work. After the meeting, send him a video version of your slides to share with others at the company (e.g., higher-ups who don’t want to listen to you talk without the option to fast-forward).

Don’t stop there. Keep using video until you seal the deal. Aberdeen reports that thirty-three percent of high-performing companies are using video to close sales.

Here are three ways to deploy videos to close a deal:

1) Rely on your customers to do the talking

Your company website probably already features customer testimonials in some prominent location. Testimonials add credibility, attract leads, and help people see exactly what you’re selling and to whom.

Now, try bringing testimonials back into play at the end of the sales cycle. No, it’s not as simple as just sending someone a link to that same video on your homepage — but it may be as simple as making a new cut of that video that focuses on a specific point.

In sales as in life, everyone just wants to feel heard and know you understand his pain points. Targeted customer testimonials kill two birds with one stone.

Here’s where all the listening you’ve done throughout the sales cycle comes in handy. Comb through those emails and think back on your pitch meetings. Is your prospect concerned about ROI? Send him a 30-second clip of a user talking about, you guessed it, how your product increased ROI. Did someone express interest in your product’s storage capabilities during a demo? Send over a snippet of a customer raving about about your awesome cloud capabilities.

Eventually, you can build a broad library of short videos that fulfill almost every potential use case. Get more bang for your buck by using these videos in targeted email drip campaigns, in addition to as part of your personal emails.

2) Send a 21st century follow-up email

Don’t have a customer testimonial that fits the bill? Try sending a video thank-you email after a meeting. Use simple recording software to quickly recap what you covered and why your product is a good fit.

As Brainshark points out, “everyone sends follow-up emails to prospects after a meeting or presentation. Video helps reps stand out from the pack and make a more impactful impression with clients.” Crack a quick joke, complain about the weather, or reference something hilarious that happened during your demo (dropped connection? accidently clicked on a honeymoon photo on your desktop?) to show them this isn’t a canned response. Then get to the meat of your message: reiterate your understanding of the client’s needs, give him a few more details about the product, and thank him profusely. Keep these videos short — 60 seconds at most.

Brainshark suggests that some sales reps “take things one step further, using PowerPoint slides to create short video presentations with narration that summarize the meeting and breaks down the next steps.” This kind of formal recap might be helpful if your initial meeting was with a more junior person lacking decision-making power: he can easily send your video around to expedite approvals.

3) Showcase FAQ videos from the customer support team

Your clients want to know that your CS team is always available. Prove that they exist — and that they’re friendly and knowledgable! — by creating FAQ videos featuring members of the team.

If you create a bunch of these videos addressing common concerns, you’ll always have one on hand for meeting follow-ups or check-ins on leads who have gone silent.

When sending these videos in the final stages of a sale conversation, include a simple message like: “I hope I answered your question in our last meeting, but just in case I didn’t, here’s a more in-depth walkthrough from Anna, a member of our customer support team.” This will do triple-duty to a) clarify your product, b) showcase the members of the CS team, and c) assure the prospect that you’ve heard their concerns and are confident that your product can address or work around them.

Video can’t do your job for you. But it can help humanize you and your company, personalize the sales process, and quickly communicate the value of your product to help close more deals.